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This work is the first comprehensive, annotative commentary ever written on the rules of ethics in Singapore. Singapore and foreign practitioners, judges, Disciplinary Tribunal members and students will find this commentary particularly helpful because of its incisive approach towards the elements of each rule of the new Legal Profession (Professional Conduct) Rules 2015 (“PCR”). By reading this book, members of the public would gain a full understanding of the responsibilities of lawyers towards clients. The Legal Profession (Foreign Representation in Singapore International Commercial Court) Rules 2014, which governs the conduct of foreign lawyers in the Singapore International Commercial Court, is analysed as well. The relationship between principles and rules (a fundamental feature of the PCR) is closely examined and the scope of their application is carefully elucidated. The book explains every rule of ethics and covers all the relevant case law and disciplinary decisions which concern ethical accountability. It addresses related legislation, the governing practice directions, rulings, guidance notes and circulars which affect a lawyer’s practice as well as judgments from other jurisdictions. As the PCR breaks new ground structurally, in content and applicability, this book will prove to be an invaluable and indispensable aid to the understanding of the unprecedented dynamics of professional conduct in modern legal practice.


Author(s)/Editor(s)/Contributor(s): Jeffrey Pinsler SC


Date of Publication: Jun 2016

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This issue features articles on: (a) the 1982 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how it has changed the Canadian criminal justice system; (b) the factors which affect the Hong Kong Judiciary in its interpretation of the constitutional right to be presumed innocent and the right against self-incrimination; (c) how ideas of constitutionalism, rule of law and fundamental rights have contributed to the development of criminal law in India; (d) the vulnerability of suspects, accused and convicted persons whilst in custody in South Africa and the possible explanations for it including a social justice deficit and ambiguity in commitment to constitutional values; (e) how interaction with the European Court of Human Rights has shaped the way that UK courts, governments and Parliament have acted on criminal justice issues and vice versa; (f) fair treatment developments in transnational and international criminal law at the international level and how national actors should approach these developments; (g) the need to shape the extent of criminal liability by taking into consideration the moral foundations of criminal law in Singapore; (h) state of the law in Singapore on aspects of the right of silence and the right of access to a lawyer of a suspect who is in custody; and (i) the evolution of Singapore’s criminal process and hopes for the future.


Author(s)/Editor(s)/Contributor(s): Associate Professor Chan Wing Cheong and Professor Michael Hor (guest editors)


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