Close
Search
Filters

Academic Journals

 

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Due to the current tightened measures, our deliveries will slightly be longer than normal. We hope for your understanding in these times.

 

 

This issue features articles on: (a) the 1982 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how it has changed the Canadian criminal justice system; (b) the factors which affect the Hong Kong Judiciary in its interpretation of the constitutional right to be presumed innocent and the right against self-incrimination; (c) how ideas of constitutionalism, rule of law and fundamental rights have contributed to the development of criminal law in India; (d) the vulnerability of suspects, accused and convicted persons whilst in custody in South Africa and the possible explanations for it including a social justice deficit and ambiguity in commitment to constitutional values; (e) how interaction with the European Court of Human Rights has shaped the way that UK courts, governments and Parliament have acted on criminal justice issues and vice versa; (f) fair treatment developments in transnational and international criminal law at the international level and how national actors should approach these developments; (g) the need to shape the extent of criminal liability by taking into consideration the moral foundations of criminal law in Singapore; (h) state of the law in Singapore on aspects of the right of silence and the right of access to a lawyer of a suspect who is in custody; and (i) the evolution of Singapore’s criminal process and hopes for the future.


Author(s)/Editor(s)/Contributor(s): Associate Professor Chan Wing Cheong and Professor Michael Hor (guest editors)


PRICE (inclusive of GST)